Using stylerignore markers, you can temporarily turn off styler. Beware that for styler > 1.2.0, some alignment is detected by styler, making stylerignore redundant. See a few illustrative examples below.

Details

Styling is on for all lines by default when you run styler.

  • To mark the start of a sequence where you want to turn styling off, use # styler: off.

  • To mark the end of this sequence, put # styler: on in your code. After that line, styler will again format your code.

  • To ignore an inline statement (i.e. just one line), place # styler: off at the end of the line. To use something else as start and stop markers, set the R options styler.ignore_start and styler.ignore_stop using options(). For styler version > 1.6.2, the option supports character vectors longer than one and the marker are not exactly matched, but using a regular expression, which means you can have multiple marker on one line, e.g. # nolint start styler: off.

Examples

# as long as the order of the markers is correct, the lines are ignored.
style_text(
  "
  1+1
  # styler: off
  1+1
  # styler: on
  1+1
  "
)
#> 
#> 1 + 1
#>   # styler: off
#>   1+1
#> # styler: on
#> 1 + 1

# if there is a stop marker before a start marker, styler won't be able
# to figure out which lines you want to ignore and won't ignore anything,
# issuing a warning.
if (FALSE) {
style_text(
  "
  1+1
  # styler: off
  1+1
  # styler: off
  1+1
  "
)
}
# some alignment of code is detected, so you don't need to use stylerignore
style_text(
  "call(
    xyz =  3,
    x   = 11
  )"
)
#> call(
#>   xyz =  3,
#>   x   = 11
#> )